Thursday, August 18, 2016

WW1 - The Orthodox Easter Friendly



It is not as celebrated as the Christmas Truce of 1914, but in 1916 some Russian and Austro-Hngarian Empire troops managed to fraternize on the Orthodox Easter of 1916. Not all of the war was in the trenches of the Western Front. Not all of humanity was drained away after the first year.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Do you have more information about this? Since A-H included Galicia, it'd be interesting to know whether the A-H troops taking part in the truce were of Ukrainian and Rusyn ancestry. (Meaning both sides were celebrating Orthodox Easter.)

Anonymous said...

Do you have more information about this? Since A-H included Galicia, it's be interesting to know if the A-H troops were of Ukrainian and/or Rusyn ancestry. (Meaning troops on both sides could have been celebrating Orthodox Easter.I know A-H did a lot to hamper Slav conversions to Orthodoxy at this time.

Toddy Cat said...

According to British historian Corelli Barnett, 1916 was the watershed year, the last year when a compromise peace might have been possible. After the Somme, Verdun, and the titanic battles on the Eastern and Italian Fronts, things would never be the same again, the damage was done. And of course, the only country that might have been able to negotiate such a peace was the U.S. That ship sailed in April, 1917. Sometime between February 1916 (the beginning of Verdun) and then, pure tragedy took over from hate, fear, and poor leadership.

Ivan Lemkyn said...

The original photo is from Moscow's Museum of the Revolution, now known the State Museum of Contemporary Russian History or something like that, which describes the photo as from the Southwest Front and the Russian soliders as belonging to the 37-ya Strelkhovaya Pekhotnaya Diviziya, the 37th Infantry Rifle Division.