Monday, September 27, 2010

Why the Tea Party is not Left/Right

Here is a nice blog post from a well respected econ blogger of what is going on with politics and what we, the people, are up against. I hope the Obamabots realize that since their guy continued the bank bailouts, wrote a stimulus that went to special interest groups (ones Dems like), gave big breaks to Big Pharma and even more tax breaks to big banks, that even as left as he is, he is in the clutches of the corporations. We have a ruling class that answers to the corporations and is not held accountable except when we vote. it is our time to start caring about exactly who we vote into office. A purging is a good thing: ask the GOP at the turn of the century, the Dems of the late 80s-early 90s and the GOP right now.


This is why the Tea Party movement is not a left/right thing. It is a people pissed off about trillions in bailouts and pet project spending thing. The Tea Party movement started with the big bank bailout phone in that made Congress pull back Paulson's original plan. When I noticed the Tea Party and got on board, it was in the spring of '09 when the FED monetizes US treasury debt, the stimulus pork crap passed, the bailout of indebted home "owners" was a way to channel money to big banks again, and then Obama did not drop the hammer on AIG or Citigroup, instead bailing them out further (then faking outrage when they paid bonuses that he already knew of). Rick Santelli's rants on CNBC about destroying the dollar was what worried me the most. We need a safe and solvent country. Deficits of $1.5 trillion a year are insane. Deficits of that magnitude can crumble the faith behind your dollar, the dollar you base every transaction on, in a short order. Ask Germany. Ask Argentina. It can happen here too.

I was drawn to it for the fiscal conservative reasons, and for the 'get government out of my life' message. The Tea party movement to me screams Reagan Democrats 2.0 to me. There are a lot of socially liberal people who are fiscally conservative, and got turned off by the hard turn the GOP made in the late '90s to constantly be the party of Jesus. Reagan believed in the big tent. Reagan believed in letting in all comers as long as they held basic principles of the conservative movement. The Tea Party movement has limited beliefs, but here's the main idea: spend less money, balance the budget, stop bailouts. As both parties now are captives of their corporate cronies, it is up to us the voters to take care of them at primary and general election level.

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